In Team fit, you are able to map potential new hires to current team members, to see how certain candidates would fit the team. This article will show you how to interpret the mapping.

The Team Fit graph

The Team Fit graph maps candidates and employees according to their results on two of the personality factors in Alva's personality test: Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Agreeableness scores are shown on the x axis, with higher results to the right, and Conscientiousness is shown on the y axis, with higher results towards the top.

Research shows that these are the two five-factor traits that have the highest impact on team effectiveness and well-being. Interestingly, similarity in these traits has turned out to be positive. Teams that have fairly similar results on Conscientiousness and Agreeableness tend to be more effective and get along better. Teams that differ widely on these traits tend to run into conflicts regarding performance standards, and also misunderstand each other to a higher extent due to very different social styles.

Interpreting the graph - some guidelines

Based on the above, results in the graph can be interpreted according to the following rules of thumb. Note, however, that there will always be exceptions and that these guidelines are based on general patterns. Do not take them as absolute truths, but rather as indications of potential strengths and challenges.

  • A team that clusters in the upper right quadrant will generally have the highest probability of showing high performance and get along well. These teams combine a goal-oriented and ambitious approach to work with a warm and empathetic climate.

  • A team where members have a large spread on Agreeableness (i.e., on the x axis) generally has a higher risk of relational conflict and low cohesion.

  • A team where members have a large spread on Conscientiousness (i.e., on the y axis) generally has a higher risk of performance problems and task-related conflict.

  • A team that clusters in the upper left quadrant will generally have a high probability of showing high performance, although they might have a somewhat more task-oriented and frank social climate.

  • A team that clusters in the bottom left quadrant generally get along fairly well since they share the same frank social style, but might have trouble performing and working in a goal-oriented way.

  • A team that clusters in the bottom right quadrant generally has a warm climate and few relational conflicts, but might have a hard time performing and working in a goal-oriented way.

You can read more about the graph axes in the article Understanding Team Fit axes.

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